FAQ: When should I retire my rescue rope?


 When should I retire my rescue rope?

It’s always best to refer to your rope manufacturer for proper care, inspection and replacement, so that’s what we did. Here’s what Steve Hudson, President of PMI Rope, had to say.

He first referenced the product literature that’s included with PMI rope that states:

RETIRE IMMEDIATELY…

  • Any rope whose strength may have been compromised during use.
  • Any rope which is subjected to uncontrolled or excessive loading.
  • Any rope which is greater than 10 years old, regardless of history and usage.
  • Any rope whose history and past usage you are uncertain about.

While these are simple statements, I realize that it is difficult to determine what is “excessive loading” or what is “compromised.” And, if you think it’s hard to look at a rope after an operation and tell if it was compromised or not – think how hard it is for us at the factory to know without being there or having the rope to look at.

Unfortunately, there’s not a reasonably priced “non-destructive” test to determine a particular rope’s strength. Your best bet is to have trained personnel using the rope, keep good rope use logs and inspect the rope after every use. Anytime you have lost faith in what you know about the rope’s condition, for any reason, you should retire it.

A PMI rope, if properly cared for, should last at least 5 years of regular rescue training use and longer than that with intermittent use. By 10 years, it’s simply time to replace it. There are just too many things in the environment that the rope might pick up and are potentially harmful to the yarn.

And, as always, when in doubt, throw it out… CUT RETIRED ROPE into short lengths which will discourage future use – or discard it entirely. A retired rope should not be stored, kept or maintained in such a way that it could inadvertently be used as a lifeline. In some cases, when only a single point or a small area of a rope has been damaged and the remainder of the rope is in good condition, the user may elect to cut that section out of the rope and continue to use the remaining sections. This is a judgment call and such a decision is left to the user’s discretion.

Again, never take chances – if you’re not sure about the integrity of a rope, throw it out!

Quick Reference for Rope Retirement:

  • Extensive Use (e.g. Roco’s training rope) – replace every two (2) years or as needed.
  • Occasional Use (e.g. once a month) – replace every five (5) years or as needed.
  • Regardless of Use – replace every ten (10) years.

About Rescue Talk

Rescue Talk is a group of seasoned rescue professionals and communicators providing relevant content to the rescue community, primarily through Roco Rescue OnLine. Rescue Talk and Roco Rescue OnLine are owned by Roco Rescue, Inc. These assets have been created as a resource for sharing insightful information, news, views and commentary for our students and other rescuers.
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